Tag Archives: sports performance traverse city

Elite Sports Performance – 2018 Athletic Enhancement Programs

It’s nearly summer which means vacations, cookouts, and the beach.  It also means our Elite Sports Performance program is back – this is one of the few times during the year that students actually have a chance to work on maximizing their athletic abilities!

The emphasis of this program will be on the following:

–  Speed and Agility                                         – Proper Running Mechanics

–  Power Development                                   – Flexibility and Injury Prevention

–  Plyometrics (jump training)                        – Strength Training Basics

 

World renown strength coach Mike Boyle made this comment recently: “Between 9th and 12th grades, an athletes skill level in their respective sports will only improve around 10%.”  That’s not much when you think about it!

“What can improve significantly is their strength, speed, and power with the proper training – which will improve their sport skills exponentially”.

Elite Sports Performance Maria Blazejewski will be coaching again this summer.  This is her 5th year with us and she has been an intern strength coach at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas as well.  Maria plays professional basketball in Europe and helps with a number of basketball clinics and camps throughout Northern Michigan.

 

 Where – Elite Physical Therapy and Sports Performance

4177 Village Park Dr. Suite B, Traverse City (next to Wuerfel Park)

 

When – Mondays/Wednesdays (July 9th – August 1st)

9:30-10:45 am – Junior High girls

11:00-12:15 pm – High School girls

 

Registration – email Joe Heiler:  Joe@elitepttc.com to sign up or call the clinic at 231 421-5805.

Cost – $80.  Multiple athlete families: 1 full tuition then 50% discount per child after that.  Payment can be mailed to the clinic or taken over the phone.

 

This is a unique opportunity for athletes to make gains in speed, agility, and power over the summer months that will carry over to fall sports programs.  We’ve had great success with this program in the past, and look forward to working with more local athletes this year.

We will push you to become the best athlete you can be!

 

Thanks,

Joe Heiler/Maria Blazejewski

joe@elitepttc.com

(p)231 421-5805

ACL Injuries and Prevention – Jump Training Part 3

Here is video #3 in our series on box jumps and how we use them here at Elite Physical Therapy and Sports Performance to decrease the risk of ACL injuries and also to improve jumping performance.

Don’t forget this Wednesday Dec. 28th – the Northern Pride Sports Academy is running a basketball clinic for 6th – 8th grade girls at Kingsley High School from 2pm – 6pm.  We will be taking athletes through our jump training progressions, injury prevention techniques, as well as what the athletes can be doing at home to continue to get better.

Here is the link to sign up:  http://www.northernpridesportsacademy.com/december-28th-clinic.html

Stay tuned as we’re planning on hosting an ACL injury prevention clinic at Elite PT in February.  I’ll have dates and times coming soon.

Joe

joe@elitepttc.com

231 421-5805

ACL Injuries and Prevention – Jump Training Part II

Last week I talked about some of the main causes of ACL injuries and why they occur at a rate of 3-4x more often in female athletes.  You can find that article along with our first jump training video here:

This week I’m posting the second video in a series of three showing how we begin jump training to a box.  This type of training can be used for ACL injury prevention and to enhance sports performance.  It’s also what we do post-surgically to get the athlete used to jumping again and landing safely.

The great thing about box jumps is that the forces on the knee are quite low because you are not coming all the way back down to the floor.  It’s also much easier because of this for the athlete to work on proper landing technique.

Before I get to the video though I thought I’d post a picture of what you don’t want your athletes knees to look like.

ACL Injuries

a.k.a. valgus collapse of the knee

Check out the video below for more:

Looks fairly simple but let me assure you it can be quite challenging for many athletes – boys included.  Learning to jump and land correctly has been proven to help prevent ACL injuries and it must also be a huge focus of any post-surgical ACL rehabilitation program.

If you have any questions feel free to contact me Joe@elitepttc.com or 231 421-5805.  We also do injury prevention and return to sport testing which does include a number of jump/hop tests.  If you’d like to know where you stand in relationship to other athletes in your sport we can definitely set that up for you.

ACL Injuries and Prevention

ACL injuries (anterior cruciate ligament) have been an epidemic in sports but even more so in women’s athletics.  Females are 3-4x more likely to tear their ACL than men.  There are several proposed theories on why this is so but for the purposes of this article and what we address here at Elite Physical Therapy we will discuss the following:

  • Poor movement quality
  • Strength deficits
  • Landing mechanics

I’ll go more in depth in subsequent articles but for now here are the basics:

Poor movement quality

There are just certain joints in our bodies that need to be very mobile in order to get us through our daily activities and especially sporting activities like running, jumping, and cutting.  Don’t get me wrong – all of our joints need to move through their full range of motion for us to be efficient movers.  Some just need to be emphasized a bit more because of their tendency to become stiff while other areas of our body need a bit more stability/motor control.  Check out the picture below to get an idea of how this works – it’s called the Joint – by – Joint theory.

Alternating sequence of mobility - stability through the entire body

Alternating sequence of mobility – stability through the entire body

It’s a very simplified way of looking at things but it does often work out this way.  The knee joint needs to have a great deal of stability in all directions to prevent injury.  If the ankle and hip joints above and below are moving well then the knee joint will more likely stay within it’s accepted range of motion during athletic movements.  If the ankle and/or hip are stiff then the knee may just have to go outside of it’s normal boundries to land from a jump or decelerate while cutting.  This is where things can go south in a hurry!

Strength deficits

There is plenty of research out there in the medical and physical therapy journals showing that strength deficits can lead to knee injuries, and in particular ACL tears. Years ago the main concern was the ration of strength between the quadriceps and hamstrings, which if it was below a certain level it could inhibit an athletes ability to decelerate correctly leading to injury.

Lately the focus has been more on the hips and muscles of the ‘core’ and how weakness or lack of control in those areas can contribute to injury.  I’ll get more into the ‘how’ and ‘why’ in another article but it is a reality that needs to be addressed.

At Elite Physical Therapy, we know that a comprehensive strength program must be implemented to assist in the prevention of ACL injuries.  Quality movement is critical for effective strength training as well.  Being able to combine these qualities is what we do best, and definitely one of my favorite things to talk about so more to come for sure!

Landing mechanics

It is also well documented that female athletes land and cut differently than the male athletes.  Women tend to land stiffer and higher than the men who typically land in deeper hip and knee flexion angles.  Stiffer and higher landings are more dangerous as far as the knee joint is concerned.

Strength and movement quality again play a large role in this.  Some athletes can’t even get into a good position to perform complex athletic movements.  Big problem!

Many don’t have the strength to get into the proper positions.  Another big problem.

As the athletic activities get faster, more complex, impose higher forces, etc it becomes more and more challenging to perform them using good technique.  Fortunately all of these qualities can be addressed through physical therapy and proper training techniques.

Check out the video below showing how we start teaching athletes to jump correctly using box jumps.  The nice thing about landing on a box is that you don’t really have to come all the way back down.  Much less strain on the knees and an easy way to work on jumping and landing technique.

I’ll be posted a new video every few days showing more of the progressions we use.  We will also be hosting some ACL prevention clinics in the near future so if you’d like to learn more and get some hands on assistance than please contact us.

Here is what we have coming up:

December 28th from 2 pm – 6 pm at Kingsley High School with the Northern Pride Sports Academy.  6th – 8th grade girls basketball skills camp.  We will be teaching a session on jumping progressions to improve athletic performance and reduce injury risk.

In February (date to be determined) we will be hosting an ACL Injury Prevention clinic here at Elite Physical Therapy and Sports Performance.  Topics will include mobility training, strength training, and jump training progressions. More on that to come as we continue to line up speakers and instructors.

For more information you can contact us at 231 421-5805.

Joe Heiler PT

Multi-Planar Single Leg Deadlift

The single leg deadlift is a staple exercise here at Elite Physical Therapy and can improve hip mobility, core and hip motor control, and also challenge balance.  Adding movement into other planes can also add value to an already excellent exercise.

Originally published on SportsRehabExpert.com by Greg Schaible
This is a great way to start exploring movement and introducing variability of motion once your typical single leg deadlift has been mastered. Start including these variations to develop better body awareness. It also can effectively be used as part of an athletes warmup.

  • Keep a soft knee and stay long through the torso
  • Torso should be in parallel with the ground

This doesn’t take the place of a progressive loading program with your standard single leg deadlift. Don’t forget the benefits that a progressive resistance program can have on tissue remodeling.

BIO

Dr. Greg Schaible is a physical therapist and strength coach specializing in athletic performance. He attended The University of Findlay as a Student Athlete. As an athlete he competed in both Indoor anGreg Schaibled Outdoor Track & Field where he earned honors as a 5x Division II All-American and a 6x Division II Academic All-American. In 2013 he completed Graduate School earning his Doctorate of Physical Therapy (DPT). Greg is the owner of On Track Physical Therapy in Ann Arbor, Mi. In addition to his rehabilitation services, Greg has a passion for youth sports specific training. Follow On Track PT Performance on Facebook.

Vastus Medialis Obliquus Muscle (VMO) “Isolation” Exercises Fact or Myth?

At Elite Physical Therapy and Sports Performance we take pride in the fact the we are well ahead of the curve with out treatment techniques compared to the rest of the traditional PT world, but we also acknowledge that it is important to use evidence based treatment techniques.

Evidence based practice is the buzz word in PT circles but despite this strengthening/isolating the VMO continues to be utilized as a way to decrease knee pain and improve function.   PT’s and physicians alike continue to prescribe strengthening for the VMO muscle of the quadriceps group even though the research has proven this concept to be faulty and ineffective.

This short article was written by a couple PT friends of mine in New York (one of which is in the PT and Strength and Conditioning Halls of Fame!) showing once and for all that you can not isolate the VMO, nor should you bother trying when it comes to solving knee pain.

Enjoy!

Originally posted on SportsRehabExpert.com

Robert A. Panariello MS, PT, ATC, CSCS
Timothy J. Stump MS, PT, CSCS, USAW

Professional Physical Therapy
Professional Athletic Performance Center
New York, New York

Patellofemoral pathology is a fairly common condition observed in clinical setting. The treatment philosophy of some rehabilitation professionals to resolve this painful condition may include the prescription of exercises in the attempt to isolate the Vastus Medialis Obliquus muscle (VMO). Although this VMO exercise isolation “myth” has been negated at least 20 years ago (1, 2) it continues to presently endure.  During this attempt to isolate VMO activity, some designated exercises executed include but are not limited to the following:

  • Quad sets
  • Terminal open chain knee extension exercises
  • Straight leg raises (SLR) with external rotation of the lower extremity

These exercises may or may not be performed with the adjunct application of electric stimulation.

Although these exercises will enhance the strength of the quadriceps muscles, likely assisting in resolving the patient’s knee pathology, this is not due to isolation of the VMO. The case some clinicians formulate for the performance of SLR with external rotation is based on the false premise that by externally rotating the femur will result in further activation of the VMO.

The knee is a hinge joint and during the execution of a SLR, the force of gravity will act in a perpendicular manner between the knee and ground surface. The quadriceps mechanism will now be required to resist the resultant force attempting to flex the knee as this is the only contractile soft tissue structure that is capable of resisting that force.  The quadriceps mechanism like any other dynamic structure can only resist this external force via the neural activation of the muscle group.  The external rotation of the femur gives rise to the placement of stress on medial collateral ligament (MCL), a static stabilizer of the knee.  This treatment philosophy actually removes stress from the very muscle(s) the clinician is attempting to enhance.  As an example a patient with a diagnosis of polio, a condition affecting the anterior horn of the femoral nerve or a patient with a quadriceps tendon rupture can still perform a SLR when externally rotating their femur based on the static stabilizing properties of the MCL.  Therefore one may inquire why would a clinician who is attempting to activate and enhance the quadriceps muscle group perform the SLR exercise in external rotation.

The anatomy and neuroanatomy of the quadriceps muscle group

The quadriceps muscle group is comprised of the rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, vastus intermedius, and vastus medialis. The vastus medialis (VM) is located at the medial aspect of this muscle group and has been reported to consist of two separate components, the proximal vastus medialis longus (VML) and the distal vastus medialis obliquus (VMO) (4). The neuroanatomy of the quadriceps muscle complex reveals an innervation from the femoral nerve.  The femoral nerve is comprised of large motor units that innervate all four heads of the quadriceps without individual fine motor unit innervation of the separate muscle heads.  Therefore, since the VMO does not have a distinct and separate nerve innervation, it is not possible to “isolate” this muscle from the other quadriceps muscles via a specific exercise performance. The most beneficial way to enhance the VMO is to incorporate the same exercise philosophy used to improve any other muscle or muscle group, the application of unaccustomed stress. The application of unaccustomed yet safe levels of stress is simply known as the “overload principle”. This may be accomplished in two ways; expose the patient to higher levels of unaccustomed resistance or overload them by increasing the velocity of the movement. Both methods will result in a positive adaption of the entire quadriceps muscle group.

Since stress transpires throughout the kinetic chain of the lower extremity during the performance of ADL’s as well as athletic endeavors, the activities prescribed for patellofemoral pathology should also include exercises for both the hip and ankle. “Critical thinking” is a requirement for the approach to the patient’s optimal exercise selection and treatment design. The health care professional’s obligation to provide optimal treatment does not include the application of myths during the patient’s plan of care.

References

1. Cerny K “Vastus medialis oblique/vastus lateralis muscle activity ratios for selected exercises in persons with and without patellofemoral pain syndrome”, Phys Ther (8):672-83, 1995
2. Malone T, Davies G, Walsh WM, “Muscular control of the patella” Clin Sports Med 21(3); 349-362, 2002.
3. Hubbard JK, Sampson HW, Elledge JR, “The Vastus Medialis Oblique Muscle and Its Relationship to Patellofemoral Joint Deterioration in Human Cadavers”, J Ortho Sports Phys Ther 28(6):384-391, 1998.
4. Weinstabl R, Scharf W, and Firbas W, “The extensor apparatus of the knee joint and its peripheral vasti: anatomic investigation and clinical relevance”, Surg and Radiological Anat  11(2): 17-22, 1989

Robert A. Panariello MS, PT, ATC, CSCS
Rob Panariello PicRob is a Founding Partner and Chief Clinical Officer with Professional Physical Therapy presently with 44 facilities in the New York and New Jersey Metro areas and the Professional Athletic Performance Center located in Garden City, New York. He has Bachelor Degrees in Physical Therapy and Physical Education/Athletic Training from Ithaca College in Ithaca, NY. He also holds his Master’s Degree in Exercise Physiology from Queens College in Queens, NY.

Rob has more than 30 years of experience in the related fields of Sports Physical Therapy, Athletic Training, and the Performance Training of Athletes. His experience includes the study of the Science of Strength and Conditioning of weightlifters and various sport athletes in Bulgaria, the former Soviet Union, and former East Germany. He previously held the positions as the Head Strength and Conditioning Coach at St. John’s University of New York (1986-1995), the World League of American Football NY/NJ Knights (1991), and the WUSA NY POWER Women’s Professional Soccer League (2001-2002). He continues to rehabilitate, athletic performance train, as well as serve as a consultant to many NFL, NBA, MLB, NHL, Collegiate and University teams, coaches, and players.

Rob has more than 60 peer reviewed Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Research, Sports Physical Therapy Research, and Strength and Conditioning Journal Articles and Book Chapter publications. He has also presented his research at the International World Confederation of Physical Therapy in Washington, D.C. He is nationally renowned and lectures throughout the country with regard to the related fields of Sports Physical Therapy and the Performance Training of Athletes.

Rob received the 2015 APTA Sports Physical Therapy Section Lynn Wallace Award for Excellence in Clinical Education, the prestigious National Strength and Conditioning Association’s Presidents Award in 1998 and was elected to the USA Strength and Conditioning Coaches Hall of Fame in 2003.

Tim StumpTimothy J. Stump is a partner with Professional Physical Therapy, and is also a founding partner with the Professional Athletic Performance Center. He  has more than 20 years of experience in the related fields of Orthopedic and Sports Physical Therapy, Strength & Conditioning, and Performance Training of Athletes of all levels of competition. Tim’s experience includes the successful participation as a nationally ranked competitive strength athlete in the sports of Powerlifting and Weightlifting from 1990-2010. He continues to actively participate in these sports as a coach and mentor to many athletes.

Tim has published several peer-reviewed original research articles and has presented his research at the APTA National Conference and at CSM. Tim was also awarded the Jacob & Valeria Langeloth Foundation research grant for studies on ACL functional outcomes while employed at the Hospital for Special Surgery. Tim was the 2012 recipient of Columbia University’s Award for “Leadership in Clinical Education” and co-chairs Professional’s Clinical Affiliation Program with over 64 school contracts providing PT, PTA, ATC and Exercise Physiology students with quality clinical affiliation experiences.

Bunke Plank Regressions

Joe Heiler PT

Originally posted on SportsRehabExpert.com

‘Core’ strengthening is always a popular topic so figured I’d highlight another set of exercises that we use here at Elite Physical Therapy and Sports Performance.

I’ve been playing around with the Bunke planks for awhile now as part of the discharge criteria for my runners and other select athletes.  It’s just one more way to gauge symmetry and in this case its looking at stability through the fascial lines of the body.  My only problem has been that the tests can be too difficult for larger athletes, older patients, and those with shoulder dysfunction so I needed to regress these planks a bit to allow all my athletes and patients a safer place to start and to give them a shot at being successful.

(Click the link below to check out the original Bunke plank series:  Bunkie Tests)

The goal of the Bunke Test is for the athlete to be able to hold each test position 40 seconds.  You’ll see in the videos below how I use some different positions to regress the planks, but you’ll also want to consider these other regressions within the positions:

–  hold the plank with both legs 40 seconds
–  perform leg lifts – either alternating or just with one leg depending on the type of plank
–  finally hold on one leg up to 40 seconds

Bunke Plank Variations – Knees

Bunke Plank Variations – Elevated

The hamstring planks can be modified by putting the forearms on a bench with the feet on the floor and then running through the progressions above.  If the shoulders are the problem, then we typically have to go to lying supine with feet up on a box or ball.

If you have any questions or want to get tested as part of our Annual Musculoskeletal Exam, just email joe@elitepttc.com or give us a call at 231 421-5805.

 

Dynamic Warm-Up for Runners Part III

In this episode Scott McKeel continues with the dynamic warm-up series including drills for lower body warm up and running technique.  These drills are great for those who have been battling common running injuries like plantarfascitis, hip bursitis, IT band syndrome or low back pain.

 

We do small group, and even individual, training sessions for runners which includes the Functional Movement Screen plus other critical tests to find the weak links in mobility and flexibility, strength, and running technique.  If you’re interested contact us:  joe@elitepttc.com

Dynamic Warm-Up for Runners Part II

Part II of Scott McKeel’s series on dynamic warm-up drills for runners.  In this episode Scott takes you through some of our favorite lower body warm up and run technique drills here at Elite Physical Therapy and Sports Performance. These drills are great for those who have been battling common running injuries like plantarfascitis, hip bursitis, IT band syndrome or low back pain.

 

We do small group, and even individual, training sessions for runners which includes the Functional Movement Screen plus other critical tests to find the weak links in mobility and flexibility, strength, and running technique.  If you’re interested contact us:  joe@elitepttc.com

Elite PT Exercise of the Week – Landmine Front Squat to Press

Joe Heiler PT and Nick Lucius SPT

At Elite Physical Therapy and Sports Performance we’re always looking for new ways to challenge our patients and athletes.  The landmine squat to press is one of those exercises that can be used to really stress the entire system without having to utilize a lot of loading so it fits in nicely in higher level rehab and during the training process.

Reasons to use this squat variation include:

1)  Having the weight in front allows the athlete to sit deeper into the squat with a more upright trunk which is great for those dealing with, or recovering from, low back pain.

2)  Keeping both hands on the bar keeps things more symmetrical with the squatting and pressing movement.  Stability requirements are increased with the use of this exercise but are balanced right to left.

3)  Hold the bar in one hand for an asymmetrical loading pattern.  This will load the body differently demanding greater stability throughout the movement.  This is a more advanced technique so 2 hands on the bar to begin.

Technique:

1)  Do not squat lower than your mobility allows!  The weight in front often allows for a deeper movement but do not let the pelvis tuck under and low back to round out.

2)  Heels must stay flat on the floor.

3)  Elbows between the knees (this keeps the knees wide).

4)  When using the asymmetrical single arm loading pattern, you must keep the body centrally aligned – no shifting, leaning, etc.

Give this one a shot and you’ll see what we mean!

BIO

Nick Lucius PicNick Lucius SPT is completing his final year in the physical therapy program at UM-Flint.  Nick is a certified strength and conditioning specialist (CSCS) through the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA), and also works as a strength coach at Barwis Method in Plymouth, MI.  After graduation Nick plans on returning to Barwis Method to work with patients affected by orthopedic and neurological conditions.

Nick played Linebacker at Grand Valley State University in his undergraduate days, and now enjoys anything active from running to weight training, and is always going through a good book.