Tag Archives: Rotator Cuff Rehab

Advanced Kettlebell Carries

We love kettlebell carries here at Elite Physical Therapy and Sports Performance as they have numerous benefits to our patients and athletes including:

  • improved shoulder girdle and trunk stability
  • increased grip strength
  • improved core control and strength

My current PT student, Mitch Babcock, has brought some new ideas to the table to make our carries even more challenging as far as the stability demands go so thought I’d share those with you.

Check out the videos here:  http://www.sportsrehabexpert.com/public/1181.cfm?sd=2

Bio

Mitch Babcock Kettlebell CarriesMitch Babcock SPT is a final year Doctor of Physical Therapy candidate from the University of Michigan — Flint. Mitch received his Bachelor’s Degree from Saginaw Valley State University in Mitch BabcockExercise Science and pursued his passion for movement and exercise to the graduate level. Mitch is certified in the Selective Functional Movement Assessment (SFMA) and the Functional Movement Screen (FMS), as well as a RockTape FMT Level II professional. He has also spent time with clinical rotations in a manual-based orthopedic clinic in mid-Michigan, a sports clinic in Charlotte, NC, and an outpatient neurological rehabilitation clinic in mid-Michigan. With a passion for full human optimization, Mitch is ready to help you get moving, get out of pain, and get back in the game.

Exercise of the Week – Wall Slides for Shoulder Pain

At Elite Physical Therapy we know that shoulder pain and rotator cuff dysfunction is often the result of multiple factors such as poor scapular stability, loss of cervical and/or thoracic mobility, and poor trunk stability just to name a few.  Wall slides are one of those exercises that will address each of these areas of concern in one shot.

I’ve featured wall slides here in the past with the back up against the wall, but in this version there isn’t the input for the wall to correct posture and there is more of a focus on scapular upward rotation.

  • Posture – get tall and press away from the wall. You’ll notice in the video how this even assists with a bit of cervical retraction.
  • keep the forearms vertical to keep the posterior rotator cuff and scapular stabilizers engaged – this will be much more difficult with the band.
  • only go as far as the forearms can stay on the wall – this forces you to work through the lats and stiff upper back muscles.

You should feel a lot of muscle activation in the back of the shoulders and between the shoulder blades.  At no time should you have shoulder pain.  If so, this exercise may not be appropriate and probably a good time to have your physical therapist or physician take a look.

Any questions feel free to email me:  joe@elitepttc.com or call 231 421-5805.

Originally posted on SportsRehabExpert.com

Graston Technique – Treating the Painful Shoulder

Here is the video I promised using Graston Technique to treat soft tissue dysfunction in the posterior shoulder girdle using and in particular the trigger points that can refer pain to the front of the shoulder and down the arm.

If you haven’t read the previous article discussing why we would want to treat this area, you can check that out here:  http://www.elitepttc.com/blog/trigger-points-and-shoulder-pain/

If you have any questions concerning Graston Technique, Dry Needling, or shoulder pain please contact us at 231 421-5805 or Joe@elitepttc.com

Trigger Points and Shoulder Pain

There are a number of manual therapy techniques we use here at Elite Physical Therapy and Sports Performance, including Graston Technique and Trigger Point Dry Needling, to address muscular pain.  What many people don’t realize is that taut bands of hyperirritable muscle (a.k.a. trigger points) can cause local and referred pain.

This article is one I wrote for SportsRehabExpert.com awhile back showing how trigger points in the back of the shoulder, specifically the muscles of the posterior rotator cuff, can refer pain to the front of the shoulder and down the arm.

If you have shoulder pain that has not responded to other types of treatment, then check out this article and please contact us with any questions you may have!

Manual Therapy Technique of the Week – Treating the Infraspinatous and Teres Minor 

Joe Heiler PT

I’ve become much more familiar with trigger point referral patterns and treating these out the past couple years since taking the Kinetacore Functional Dry Needling course.  A couple of the more common trigger points I end up dry needling and/or using Graston Technique to treat in the shoulder are the infraspinatous and teres minor.  Active trigger points in these muscles can refer pain to the anterior and middle shoulder, and on occasion will also refer pain down the arm.

Check out the typical trigger points and referral patterns below:

Infraspinatous Trigger Points and Pain Referral Pattern

Infraspinatous Trigger Points and Pain Referral Pattern

Teres Minor Trigger Point and Pain Referral Pattern

Teres Minor Trigger Point and Pain Referral Pattern

 

Case Study

Current patient of mine presented with R shoulder and scapular pain of 2 year duration.  MS rotation limited to 50% bilaterally (DP) and R shoulder medial rotation extension (MRE) reach only to L4 (DP).  Palpation of the infraspinatous trigger point (most superior and lateral) referred significant pain to the anterior shoulder and slightly down the lateral arm reproducing her typical pain.  The teres minor trigger point referred pain to the middle deltoid area.

Post trigger point dry needling of these trigger points the patient’s MS rotation improved to 90% (dysfunctional still but non-painful) and R shoulder MRE to T9 (still DP but much less pain).

It’s not always this dramatic but this is also not the first time I’ve seen the great results like this.

I’ll get a video up soon showing how we use Graston Technique to treat the posterior shoulder to reduce this type of pain and improve shoulder function.

In the meantime feel free to contact us with any questions:  231 421-5805 or Joe@elitepttc.com