Tag Archives: lumbar spine pain

Elite PT Newsletter August 18′ – Running Injuries: Preventing Lower Back Pain

We’re continuing with our series on running injuries – this month focusing on how to prevent lower back pain.

But first:

I want to welcome our new PT student Charlie Crockatt

Charlie CrockattCharlie is in his third and final year of Grand Valley State University’s doctorate of physical therapy program, and is with us until October for hands-on clinical experience. He grew up in Livonia Michigan, playing football and baseball for the Stevenson Spartans. After high school he completed his undergraduate work at Central Michigan University, studying athletic training. After graduation from PT school, he is interested in working with athletic populations of all ages and hopes to travel outside of Michigan. In his free time, he enjoys the outdoors and also plays drums for an indie rock band called Birdie Country.

Charlie will be a great fit at Elite PT and will be here through October 5th.
_______________________________________________________________
Running Injuries continued:  Preventing Lower Back Pain

Unfortunately lower back pain is a frequent problem for runners especially as distances increase.

As you’ve learned from our previous articles on running injuries, having good joint mobility and flexibility are very important for injury prevention.  When it comes to your lower back, the more mobile and flexible you are through the joints above and below – specifically ankles, hips, and thoracic spine – the better.

Another important consideration is core stability.  I prefer to use the term ‘stability’ over the more common term ‘strength’ because that’s really what we are after.  Stability, in this case, is the ability of the muscles of the trunk to maintain a safe position of the joints of the spine while you alternately swing your arms and legs to run.  In simpler terms:  to keep your lower back relatively still while the rest of you moves.

One of the best ways to train for stability is to use a variety of plank exercises to challenge the various muscle groups on the front, back, and sides of the trunk.  These are known as Bunke Planks and are pictured below:






Use a small box or chair approximately 12-18″ high (the higher it gets the easier it tends to get).

These exercises were introduced a few years back as a way of developing stability and endurance through the trunk muscles but also to compare how stable a runner was right to left.  Everything is done on one leg and compared to the opposite side.  Competitive runners should be able to hold each position 40 seconds at a minimum on each leg.  Asymmetries right to left (i.e. hold on left leg 40 seconds but only 25 seconds on the right) was thought to put runners at a substantially higher risk of injury.  Not being able to hold the full 40 seconds was not as big a deal but still thought to increase risk of injury.

So that’s the quick and dirty history of the Bunke Planks in one paragraph.  Competitive runners should be able to hold each plank 40 seconds on each leg in each position.  This can be very challenging, and very eye opening as some folks think they are quite ‘strong’ through their core until they try these!

For the rest of us, these planks can be very difficult and in some cases way to advanced.  Luckily there are a number of regressions possible that can be used to build up stability and endurance and maybe eventually work up to the full blown Bunke plank.

The easiest thing to do in some cases is just to do the plank in the pictures on both legs and work up to 40 seconds before trying to lift a leg.

From there alternate lifting legs up to 10 reps each leg.  You will only be holding a few seconds each leg before switching to the other.  If your on your side you would lift the top or bottom leg 10 time then switch sides.

The next step would be to start working in longer holds.

The shoulders can often be limiting factors in performing the Bunke planks – here are some regressions to take the shoulders out completely or at least to decrease the total amount of body weight you must hold up:

Hamstring Bridging

Single Leg Hamstring Bridge

Lift the tailbone but not the lower back!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Side Plank (from the knees)

Side Plank from knees

Hold the hips high and lift the top leg up and down

 

 

 

 

 

Front Planks (from the knees)

Kneeling Front Plank

Keep the hips high and back flat

 

 

 

 

If you have any questions at all or are suffering from lower back pain feel free to email me:  Joe@elitepttc.com

Keep running and stay healthy!

 

Joe Heiler

231 421-5805

Joe@elitepttc.com

Solving Lower Back Pain – Find the Pain Relieving Direction

Just a reminder we’ll be hosting a Back Pain and Sciatica workshop November 4th from 10-11am.  If you are suffering from lower back pain and/or symptoms that go down your leg then this is for you!

One of the topics we will be covering is what we call finding a directional preference.  Many folks with lower back pain, including symptoms down one or both legs, will have a direction that their back prefers to move in.  It could be flexion (forward bending) or extension (backward bending).  Finding a definite preference can often lead to a significant reduction in symptoms on day 1.

What is also true on many occasions is that moving in the opposite direction will make their symptoms worse.  So avoiding activities that increase pain, or just adapting them to avoid certain movements, can also reduce symptoms quickly.

Check out the new video for more information including a mini-case study on how it can work.

At Elite PT we are trained to determine if there is a directional preference and then how to best take advantage of that for a quicker recovery.  This is just one strategy that we will discuss at our Back Pain and Sciatica Workshop.  For more information or to sign up just give us a call at 231 421-5805.

 

Elite PT July 2017 Newsletter: Lower Back Pain, Employee Spotlight – Jesie Bott, Exercise Tips and more…

Hope you’re having a great summer and surviving the craziness that is northern Michigan in July.

This months newsletter features:

  • Employee Spotlight – Jesie Bott
  • Lower Back Pain – 80% of us are going to have it!
  • Exercise Tip of the Month

Employee Spotlight
Jessica “Jesie” Bott was our very first employee starting back in 2012.  She took a bit of a hiatus after giving birth to her daughter but she’s been back a couple years now and we love having her around as much as possible.  Jesie home schools her two children and works Fridays during the school year but in the summer we’re blessed to have her 2.5 days per week.  She’s got a ton of energy and really loves to get to know her patients and clients.  She does a great job for us here at Elite Physical Therapy so we wanted to tell her story.

Jesie is an Athletic Trainer and licensed massage therapist, graduating from Grand Valley State University in 2005.  Jesie has worked in the outpatient orthopedic setting since graduation, and also worked as the athletic trainer at Kingsley High School for 5 years.  Jesie is a Graston Technique Certified Clinician, and trained through Functional Movement Systems giving her the ability to critically analyze a person’s movement ability and develop exercise programs that really work!

Why did you become an ATC/LMT?
“I had an inclination toward sports and health and wanted a career that kept me physically active and challenged me mentally.  Athletic training was a perfect fit!”

What do you enjoy most about the job?
“What I truly like best about my job is helping people feel better. I’m passionate about it.  I want to see people get results and I’m happy to be a part of that.  At Elite, I enjoy the one on one experience with each patient as well as having the freedom and ability to use my knowledge and creativity to problem solve and do everything I can to help someone feel better.”

What do you do for fun?
“Other than working at Elite….:)  I enjoy spending quality time with my family.  We love to be outdoors, camping, playing in the water and playing with our sweet puppy.”

Jesie has been married to David Bott for 13 years and have two great kids – Chase and Clare.  Jesie also owns Freedom Massage Therapy and currently sees clients at Elite PT on Tuesdays and Fridays. You can call her at 231 357-0151 for more details.

___________________________________________________________________

Did you know that lower back pain will affect at least 80% of us at least once in our lifetimes.  Depending on the research article, once you’ve had a back pain episode, chances are between 60-80% that you’ll have recurring episodes beyond that.  Not great odds at all.

Here at Elite PT, lower back pain is the most common diagnosis that we treat.  There are numerous causes of lower back pain – some easier to fix than others, but it’s our job to figure that out.

One of the more common causes is Spinal Stenosis.  Stenosis literally means ‘narrowing’ and in this case the narrowing can cause compression and irritation to the nerves that leave the spinal cord and go out to the lower back, hips, and legs.  This causes pain across the lower back and can also produce symptoms into one or both legs.

spinal stenosis

How do you know that you may have Spinal Stenosis?

  • 50+ years old
  • Standing and walking increase symptoms
  • Sitting and lying down relieve symptoms
  • Leaning on the cart at the grocery store allows you to walk with less back pain

Spinal stenosis, like most types of lower back pain, is something that can absolutely be treated in physical therapy.  Certain muscles being ‘tight’ can create more compression and narrowing and therefore must be address using soft tissue techniques like massage, Graston Technique and dry needling.  Exercises must also be incorporated to stretch those tight muscles and improve how our joints move around the back and hips.

Other muscles tend to be ‘weak’, specifically the abdominals and glutes.  When strong and working with the right timing these muscles can reduce damaging forces across the spine.

A comprehensive physical therapy program that addresses all these factors can be extremely beneficial.

Here is what one of our former clients with spinal stenosis had to say:

Patient Testimonial
“I came to Elite taking medication to numb the pain in my back and legs so I could make it through the day.  Thanks to Jesie I have no more pain and know how to strengthen the muscles to help prevent the pain from returning.  She is a great therapist and I will use her again in the future if the need arises.”
– D.B. from Traverse City

__________________________________________________________________

Exercise Tip of the Week

Child’s Pose is a common yoga pose that produces flexion through the hips and spine.  For someone with spinal stenosis this movement frequently decreases or eliminates the person’s symptoms.  If it relieves your pain, then do it whenever you need relief!

Child's Pose

Try to sit back on your heels – unfortunately my knees don’t bend that far!

In the bottom position, take 4 breaths in through the nose and out through the mouth.  Breathing in this manner decreases tone through the back muscles and also calms the nervous system bringing further relief.

For those with knee pain who can’t perform this exercise, try the seated floor press below.  It’s basically the same movement but with more body weight (usually fine but can be too much if you’re really sore).  Use the same breathing technique but be sure to put your hands on your knees to push yourself back up when you’re done.  This just takes some extra pressure off your back.
Seated Floor Press

You may find these simple exercises can make a huge difference in how you feel and how long you can be on your feet throughout the day.  If so, just keep doing them and you may just be able to keep yourself out of pain.

If you have all the signs and can only get temporary relief with the exercises then you probably would benefit from physical therapy.  Call us if you have questions (231 421-5805) and we could tell you if PT is for you.
____________________________________________________________

Have a great month of July with hopefully more warm weather to come.

We can be reached at 231 421-5805 or through email:  Joe@elitepttc.com if you have questions or if you just want to let us know how you’re doing.

Back Pain and Sciatica – Part 2

Last month I posted a case study showing how we treat back pain and associated ‘sciatica’ like symptoms here at Elite Physical Therapy in Traverse City.  You can find that article here:  http://www.elitepttc.com/back-pain-and-sciatica-physical-therapy-treatments/

This month’s case study is a little different in that the presentation and location of the pain were quite different but it still comes down to playing detective to determine where the patient’s symptoms are really coming from.  Before we get started here, I’m re-posting the picture of the dermatomes of the body (basically the sensory distribution of the nerves from the spine) so be sure to check that out.  Pretty cool how we were created for sure!Dermatomes

Case Study #2

The patient in this case presented to our clinic with pain shooting into the front of his hip and groin as well as down the front and side of his thigh.  He also reported minor back pain but it was nothing compared to the pain in his leg.  The patient reported having this pain on and off over the past couple years especially when exercising but recently it was much more constant and severe.  In the past he had been diagnosed with IT Band syndrome (pain laterally in the hip and thigh might make you think that), and more recently with a hip flexor strain (could also make sense now that he was having more pain into the front of the hip and groin).

Exam

  • minimal tenderness to the ‘hip flexor’ muscles anteriorly, slight weakness with manual muscle testing but no pain (probably not a hip flexor strain).
  • moderate tenderness and active trigger points in the lateral hip musculature that referred pain down the lateral thigh to the knee (could be part of IT Band syndrome).
  • springing of the lumbar vertebrae at L2 and L3 reproduced the typical symptoms  he felt into his anterior hip/groin as well as lateral thigh (Bingo!)

Treatment

Dry needling was performed at the levels of L2 and L3 along with electric stimulation for 10 minutes, and followed up with Graston Technique (GT) to decrease tone and improve mobility of the superficial fascia and muscles of the mid and lower back.

A couple exercises were given to maintain, and hopefully even improve, the mobility gained through the spine and hips as a result of the dry needling and GT.

Results

The patient reported a significant decrease in the anterior hip and groin symptoms as well as a moderate improvement in lateral hip and thigh symptoms.

During the second treatment session I decided to treat the muscles of the lateral hip as well since they also referred pain into the lateral thigh.  This was done with by dry needling + e-stim just like we had done in the low back.

By the third treatment session a few days later the patient was reporting a significant reduction in lateral hip and thigh symptoms as well.

Final Thoughts

It took a few more treatments to completely resolve this patient’s symptoms but it’s nice to see an immediate decrease in symptoms to know that you are treating the right areas.  With a thorough evaluation process it wasn’t hard to figure out that the patient’s symptoms were primarily coming from his spine which was quite a different diagnosis than what was previously thought.

A little detective work plus effective treatment tools like dry needling and Graston Technique can make a huge difference in patient outcomes especially in these ‘sciatica’ cases.  If you have similar types of symptoms or pain that just doesn’t ever seem to get better then give us a call!  If you have any questions feel free to email me:  joe@elitepttc.com

Back Pain and Sciatica – Physical Therapy Treatments

This month I figured I’d post on a couple case studies related to back pain and sciatica, and how we evaluate and treat cases like this at Elite Physical Therapy.  We’ve had a lot of great success with these folks so thought I’d share a couple examples.

Back pain, and associated leg pain, can be difficult to treat but we like a challenge!  Playing detective can be fun if you know what to look for.  Check out the pictures below that show the paths the spinal nerves take throughout the body.  Leg pain (or what many people like to call ‘sciatica’) can follow a number of paths down the leg and sometimes that can be a dead give away to identify exactly where the pain is coming from.

dermatomes

***The letter and numbers above correspond to a particular spinal nerve, i.e. L4 means lumbar spinal nerve #4 ***

There are other ways to narrow down the location of the problem as well:

  • the muscles will be painful to palpation at a specific vertebral segment and may even refer pain down the leg when palpated with deeper pressure.
  • reflexes may be diminished.  A slow or non-existent patellar tendon reflex corresponds with lumbar spinal nerve #4.
  • Muscles may test weaker on the affected side which may indicate an injury to a particular spinal level or nerve.  An example of this would be weakness in the calf muscles (can’t lift up on to the toes) which are controlled by the first two sacral nerves (S1 and S2 on the chart).

So here’s a great example of a number of these factors all lining up and how quickly the pain and loss of function can be addressed.

Case Study #1

The patient in this case had left sided low back pain and pain running down through the back of her hip and leg to the mid-calf.  She felt a ‘pop’ in her back and immediate leg pain as a result of pushing and twisting trying to put a heavy object in the back of her truck.  She is an avid runner but even standing and walking significantly increase her pain after 10 minutes.

Exam

So here is what I found:

  • Symptoms following the S1 and 2 dermatomes down the back of the left leg
  • Increased muscle tone/spasm at the S1 and S2 levels of the spine, and these muscles are tender to palpation.
  • ‘Springing’  or pushing down on the S1/S2 vertebrae reproduced the symptoms into the back of her hip/upper thigh.
  • She could do only 12 calf raises on her left leg while doing 25 on the right side (this muscle corresponds with S1 and S2 nerves).
  • Achilles reflexes normal (S1 reflex)

It’s nice when everything points back to a specific level or two like that.  Doesn’t always work that way but when it does it makes me much more confident that we can knock this out quickly.

Treatment

In this case I chose to use dry needling to address the muscles at the S1 and S2 spinal levels on both sides of the spine.  Once the needles were placed I attached an electrical stimulation unit and she just relaxed for 10 minutes.  Dry needling in conjunction with e-stim are shown in the research to decrease tone within the muscles as well as alleviate pain through a number of local and global factors.

The patient was instructed in two exercises that had multiple purposes:

  • decrease pain through relaxation of the over worked muscles of the back and anterior hip
  • facilitate improved stability through the lumbar spine and pelvis

Pretty simple exercises that are beyond the scope of this article but lots of bang for your buck when they only take 5 minutes 2-3 x per day.

Results

The patient had near full resolution of symptoms for two days after the first session.  Her exercises relieved her pain at home and she could walk as much as she wanted.  She tried to run on the third day but was unable due to pain.

We repeated the same dry needling + e-stim treatment during the second visit and followed it up by progressing her exercise program.

The patient cancelled her appointment the next week as she reported being completely pain free and back to running.

Final Thoughts

Sometimes it just works that well but I certainly won’t make that guarantee in every case!  Back pain and ‘sciatica’ cases can be quite complex but knowing how to put together all the puzzle pieces definitely helps.

That’s probably enough to wrap your head around for this time.  Next month I’ll post another case study but with a different symptom presentation.  In the meantime if you have any questions just shoot me an email:  joe@elitepttc.com or call 231 421-5805.

Band Walks and Hip Strengthening

Band walks (a.ka. Monster Walks) are a physical therapy staple for hip strengthening, and are often used with patients who have had knee injuries or are suffering from back and/or hip pain.

It has been shown in the research that weakness of the glute muscles of the hip can be a direct cause of poor alignment through the lower extremities creating problems such as patellofemoral pain (anterior knee pain) and also putting one at higher risk for ACL injury.

Weakness through the hips is also proposed to be a cause of lower back pain since one is using the hip inefficiently to stand up, squat, lift, etc then the tendency is to overuse the lower back muscles to perform these tasks.

So strengthening the hip muscles sounds like a great idea right?

It can be when done correctly.  In the video below I demonstrate the wrong way to perform these exercises along with some simple corrections (the corrections may look simple, but they make the exercise much more difficult – and effective).

Hopefully you noticed that I talked about the importance of the trunk remaining stable throughout the exercise.  Only through stabilizing the trunk can the hip truly generate efficient force.  This is the most common mistake made, and in my opinion, makes the exercise a complete waste of time.

Give it a shot and let me know if you have any questions.

Joe@elitepttc.com

 

 

The Bird Dog – A Core Stability Classic

The ‘bird dog‘ exercise is a core stability classic in the physical therapy world, and is certainly a favorite of ours here at Elite Physical Therapy.

That being said I see this exercise done incorrectly more often than not.

The whole idea behind core stability is to resist unwanted movement through the pelvis and spine when moving through the hips and shoulders.  Watching most therapists, and even yoga and pilates instructors, teach this exercise you would think just the opposite.  Check out the video below to see the exercise performed incorrectly (first 3 reps) and then done correctly (next 3 reps).

When performed incorrectly you can see how much movement is occurring through the lumbar spine.  Many folks are stuck in excessive lumbar lordosis (too much inward curvature) which can become painful especially with prolonged standing and walking.  A majority of the athletes I work with, including the dancers and gymnasts, would fall in this category as well.  Going into even more lordosis is only going exacerbate the issue.

As you can see when performed correctly, nothing moves through the pelvis and spine.  It’s only my shoulders and hips.  Performing a bit of a posterior pelvic tilt (think tucking the tailbone) will bring the person out of the excessive lordosis and help to stabilize the trunk.  Also notice there is much less excursion with the upper and lower extremities.  There is no way you can lift the arms and legs as high as in the first example and maintain any type of stability.

There are times however that a bit of lumbar lordosis (arch) may be necessary to maintain throughout the exercise.  Sometimes this is just the more comfortable position to be in.  If that’s the case then that is going to be the appropriate position for your body.

To learn to stabilize in this position, using a water bottle either across or along the spine is a nice trick (the latter being the more challenging).  Focusing on keeping the water bottle from rolling off your back will reflexively fire more muscles and with the correct timing to keep your spine and pelvis stable.

Adding a resistance band would be a higher level challenge. Do not attempt to add resistance until you are able to control your body weight.

Give the bird dog a try yourself and see how much more challenging it can be when you actually stabilize the core!

If you have any questions, contact me at joe@elitepttc.com or at 231 421-5805.

 

Training to Prevent Low Back Pain – Feet Raised Bench Press

Low back pain is a huge part of what we treat at Elite Physical Therapy and Sports Performance.  Even folks coming in for treatment with knee replacement or shoulder pain (just a couple examples), will often complain of pain and tightness in their low back as well.   Dysfunction and pain in the lower back can certainly contribute and cause problems in other areas of the body.

In the coming weeks I’ll be posting a series of articles written by Andy Barker (SportsRehabExpert.com contributor) and myself that discuss how to spare your lower back during the performance of popular strength training exercises.  Hopefully you’ll find some good tips to keep that spine healthy all the while making great gains with your training.

Enjoy and if you have any questions feel free to email me:  joe@elitepttc.com

 

by Andy Barker PT

originally posted at SportsRehabExpert.com

I think we do a great job at cueing and coaching good pelvic position when using standing based gym exercises.  Equally, cueing the same position in supine in an unloaded state we also get it right.

However, when adding load to supine based exercises good pelvic form is often lost.

A great example of this is the bench press. Often when the load goes up so does load through the back as compensatory lumbar extension assists the lift. This is especially so when the feet are placed on the floor either side of the bench.

One easy way to reduce the effects of possible lumbar compensatory extension is to raise the feet to put the pelvis into posterior tilt and hence out of lumbar extension. This is shown in the video below:

Feet Raised Bench Press

One potential problem with the above technique is that athletes may feel less steady with the feet not placed on the floor and hence unable to shift as much load. This might be particular so the wider the athlete and/or the narrower the bench used.

As a result an alternative way to increase support whilst also raising the feet is using plyo boxes to act as foot platforms. Using the boxes allows athletes to push into the floor, via the boxes, as they would in a standard bench press, although in a much better pelvic position. This is shown in the video below:

Feet raised bench press (plyo boxes)

Have a blast and let me know what you think

BIO

Andy is the current head physiotherapist for the Leeds Rhinos first team squad and has been involved with the club for the past six seasons.

He graduated in Physiotherapy from the University of Bradford with a first class honours degree which followed on from a previous Bachelor of Science degree from Leeds Metropolitan University in Sports Performance Coaching.

Andy currently works privately in addition to his sporting work and has also previous experience within National League basketball and professional golf.

Andy has a keen interest in injury prevention and the biomechanics of movement in which he is continuing his studies with the start of a MSc degree later this year in Sports and Exercise Biomechanics.

Andy is also the creator and author of rehabroom.co.uk. RehabRoom is a free online rehab resource site aimed at but not exclusive to physiotherapists, strength and conditioning coaches and personal trainers. To visit the site, click here:  www.rehabroom.co.uk

Functional Dry Needling for Low Back Pain

Functional Dry Needling has been a great addition to my manual therapy ‘tool box’ especially for those with low back pain.  Recently, Nelson Min PT from Kinetacore (the group that trained me) wrote a short article on using dry needling for patients with spinal stenosis.

Spinal stenosis is one of the most common causes of low back pain in folks 50+ years of age.  The most common presentation is pain with standing and walking that is relieved with sitting down, forward bending, or lying down.

So here is Nelson’s article on Functional Dry Needling and the treatment of Spinal Stenosis:

“I listen for several things when evaluating a new patient with low back pain.  I take particular interest when my patient informs me that their pain increases with prolonged standing or walking versus pain that increases with prolonged sitting.  An older patient that tells me that their back pain increases with prolonged standing and walking, and is then relieved immediately with sitting, makes me suspect stenosis.  For someone younger, I am suspicious of spondylosis or some other instability.  I would confirm this with my biomechanical exam but this little detail in the patient’s history often steers me in the right direction.”

Listen to your patient — he is telling you the diagnosis.  – William Osler MD

To continue reading, head on over to Kinetacore.com

If you have questions on Functional Dry Needling or the treatment of back pain, feel free to email joe@elitepttc.com or call me at 231 421-5805231 421-5805

Now at Elite Physical Therapy – Functional Dry Needling

Functional Dry Needling is a very effective manual therapy technique that I’ve been wanting to learn for some time now, and was recently trained though Kinetacore.  I’m very excited to be using this new technique and I’m already seeing some great results.

In this week’s blog post, I want to give some very basic background on what Dry Needling is, and is not.  The article below doesn’t mention this but I want to make it quite clear that this is not acupuncture.  The only similarity is the use of the same type of needle.  Dry Needling performed by a physical therapist requires a thorough musculoskeletal evaluation, and placement of the needle into specific taut bands of muscle (a.k.a. trigger points) that are pain generators and creating dysfunction within the system.

My knowledge of acupuncture is somewhat limited but generally speaking the points that are treated in the body are mapped out along ‘meridians’.  Needles are placed into these preset points and left for a certain amount of time.

There is a lot more to it than just this, and I think it is important to understand that there are differences.  The description of Functional Dry Needling below comes from the Kinetacore website.  It’s a quick primer on the technique.  If you want to see it in action, check out the video at the bottom of the page featuring Terry Bradshaw.

“Dry Needling is a general term for a therapeutic treatment procedure that involves multiple advances of a filament needle into the muscle in the area of the body which produces pain and typically contains a ‘Trigger Point’.   There is no injectable solution and typically the needle which is used is very thin. 

Most patients will not even feel the needle penetrate the skin, but once it has and is advanced into the muscle, the feeling of discomfort can vary drastically from patient to patient.  Usually a healthy muscle feels very little discomfort with insertion of the needle; however, if the muscle is sensitive and shortened or has active trigger points within it, the subject may feel a sensation much like a muscle cramp — which is often referred to as a ‘twitch response’.

The twitch response also has a biochemical characteristic to it which likely affects the reaction of the muscle, symptoms, and response of the tissue. Along with the health of the tissue, the expertise of the practitioner can also attribute to the variation of outcome and/or discomfort.  The patient may only feel the cramping sensation locally or they may feel a referral of pain or similar symptoms for which they are seeking treatment. A reproduction of their pain can be a helpful diagnostic indicator of the cause of the patient’s symptoms. Patients soon learn to recognize and even welcome this sensation as it results in deactivating the trigger point, thereby reducing pain and restoring normal length and function of the involved muscle.

Typically positive results are apparent within 2-4 treatment sessions but can vary depending on the cause and duration of the symptoms, overall health of the patient, and experience level of the practitioner. Dry needling is an effective treatment for acute and chronic pain, rehabilitation from injury, and even pain and injury prevention, with very few side effects. This technique is unequaled in finding and eliminating neuromuscular dysfunction that leads to pain and functional deficits.”

If you have further questions about the technique, or feel that this technique may work for you then feel free to contact us:  joe@elitepttc.com or 231 421-5805231 421-5805.